The Jacobean Way to Fisterra-Muxía embodies the traditional pilgrim phrase of “Ultreia!”, which means “Onwards!” and beyond. Indeed there is further to go than Santiago de Compostela. Having paid their respects to St. James many pilgrims choose to continue to the “end of the world”.

 

Until the Middle Ages, Finisterre and Muxia were thought to be the ends of the Earth, where souls ascended to heaven, hence the name Costa da Morte (Coast of Death). Although we now know that the Earth has no end, the magnificence of the vast ocean and being at the edge of a continent has a profound effect on visitors and has attracted people since before the days of Christianity.

The route became linked to the Camino de Santiago back in the 12th century and has been well-trodden ever since, although it is quieter than the routes leading to the famous city.

Experience two ‘ends of the Earth’ by walking or cycling 89 kilometres through lush green countryside to Finisterre and then a further 30 km to the fishing village of Muxía. Watching the sun sink into the ocean from both of these places is a wonderful way to end your pilgrimage.

Many pilgrims burn their boots or an item of clothing to symbolise the end of their challenge and the start of a new phase.

Finisterra/Muxia Tours

Camino de Santiago

Santiago - Muxia

Experience two ‘ends of the Earth’ by walking through lush green countryside to Finisterre and then the fishing village of Muxía. Watching the sun sink into the ocean from both
Camino de Santiago

Santiago - Finisterre

See a different side of Santiago as you head towards the ‘end of the Earth’ along a peaceful, beautiful trail. Watch the sun slip into the Atlantic Ocean as you
Camino de Santiago

Finisterre / Muxia Way (cycling)

Experience the ‘end of the Earth’ by cyling through lush green countryside to Finisterre and then the fishing village of Muxía. Watching the sun sink into the ocean from both of